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Doyon  Won, Nutter McClennen & Fish LLP Photo

Doyon Won

Associate / Boston

Overview

Doyon Won is an associate in Nutter’s Intellectual Property Department. With his deep knowledge in life science technologies, Doyon counsels clients on drafting and prosecuting patent applications and strategic portfolio management in a broad range of technology areas, including:

  • Small molecule drugs
  • Biologics
  • Oligonucleotide therapeutics
  • Medical devices
  • Diagnostics
  • Chemistry
  • Bioinformatics

During law school, Doyon worked at The George Washington University’s Technology Commercialization Office, where he assisted in the University’s technology commercialization efforts. Prior to pursuing a career in law, Doyon held various positions in the pharmaceutical and financial sectors after completing his Ph.D in pathobiology.

In addition to his intellectual property work, Doyon is committed to the firm’s proud legacy of pro bono representation. In collaboration with Kids in Need of Defense (KIND), Doyon works to help secure lawful permanent residency for children who had been neglected and abandoned in their home country.

Doyon is granted limited recognition under 37 CFR 11.9(b) by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to practice in patent matters.

To view Doyon’s LinkedIn profile, please click here.

News & Insights

Education & Admissions

Education

The George Washington University Law School, J.D.

University of Toronto, Ph.D., Laboratory Medicine & Pathobiology

University of Toronto, B.Sc., Human Biology

Admissions

  • Massachusetts
  • U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit 
  • U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts
  • U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Before Nutter

Before law school, Doyon prepared new drug application submissions as a regulatory affairs associate at a Canadian pharmaceutical company and advised startups as an associate at a boutique investment bank.

Noteworthy

Doyon completed his Ph.D. in laboratory medicine and pathobiology where his research focused on endothelial cell mechanotransduction in early stages of atherosclerosis.

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