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Doyon  Won, Nutter McClennen & Fish LLP Photo

Doyon Won

Associate / Boston

Overview

Doyon (Don) Won is an associate in Nutter’s Intellectual Property Department. Drawing on his professional experience, scientific knowledge, and fluency in Korean, Don advises clients on a variety of intellectual property matters.

Notable Experience and Client Impact

  • Drafted and prosecuted patent applications in a variety of fields, including biotechnology, medical devices, chemicals, bioinformatics, and software
  • Advised a biotechnology company on the strategic management of its patent portfolio
    Researched and advised on legal issues relating to an IP transaction agreement for a food and beverage company
  • Prosecuted trademark applications for a startup technology company

Read More

During law school, Don worked at The George Washington University’s Technology Commercialization Office where he was involved in all stages of the University’s technology commercialization efforts. Before law school, Don prepared new drug application submissions as a regulatory affairs associate at a Canadian pharmaceutical company and advised startups as an associate at a boutique investment bank.

Don completed his Ph.D. in laboratory medicine and pathobiology where his research focused on endothelial cell mechanotransduction in early stages of atherosclerosis.

To view Don’s LinkedIn profile, please click here.

News & Insights

Education & Admissions

Education

The George Washington University Law School, J.D.

University of Toronto, Ph.D., Laboratory Medicine & Pathobiology

University of Toronto, B.Sc., Human Biology

Admissions

  • Massachusetts
  • U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit 
  • U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts

Before Nutter

Before law school, Don prepared new drug application submissions as a regulatory affairs associate at a Canadian pharmaceutical company and advised startups as an associate at a boutique investment bank.

Noteworthy

Don completed his Ph.D. in laboratory medicine and pathobiology where his research focused on endothelial cell mechanotransduction in early stages of atherosclerosis.