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  • Posts by Ronald E. Cahill
    Partner

    Ronald E. Cahill is a partner in Nutter’s Intellectual Property and Litigation Departments and chairs Nutter’s Intellectual Property Litigation Practice Group. Ron works with clients of all sizes to solve their most ...

The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) released final rules on January 9, 2015 implementing changes to the way in which Patent Term Adjustment (PTA) is calculated in view of the recent Novartis v. Lee case.

Posted in Litigation, Patents

The equitable defense of laches may not be at the forefront of most patent practitioners’ minds, but the recent Federal Circuit decision in SCA Hygiene Products v. First Quality Baby Products illustrates that the defense can have teeth. Patent owners looking to mitigate the risk of an accused infringer successfully employing the defense should consider preventative action in the period before filing a lawsuit. Practitioners may also want to continue monitoring the law in this area, as an en banc rehearing has been requested to consider the possible impact of a recent Supreme Court ruling with regard to laches in the context of copyright infringement.

In late June, the United States Supreme Court issued a long-awaited decision in Alice Corporation Pty. Ltd. v. CLS Bank International that may have broad-reaching implications on patenting software. At issue in the case was whether claims to a computer-implemented system and method for mitigating “settlement risk” in financial transactions are eligible for patenting under 35 U.S.C. § 101. In a unanimous decision, the Court held that the claims were directed to an abstract idea and, although implemented on a computer, were not patentable.

Today’s long-awaited decision by the United States Supreme Court in Alice Corporation Pty. Ltd. v. CLS Bank International, 573 U.S. ___ (2014) may have broad-reaching implications on patenting software. At issue in the case was whether claims to a computer-implemented system and method for mitigating “settlement risk” in financial transactions are eligible for patenting under 35 U.S.C. § 101. In a unanimous decision, the Court held that the claims were directed to an abstract idea and, although implemented on a computer, were not patentable.

This week the Federal Circuit again raised the bar for succeeding on claims of active inducement of infringement, holding that an alleged infringer’s “good-faith belief of invalidity may negate the requisite intent for induced infringement.” In doing so, it created an additional reason for companies to obtain opinions from counsel on the validity of competitors’ patents.

Maximizing the protection and value of intellectual property assets is often the cornerstone of a business's success and even survival. In this blog, Nutter's Intellectual Property attorneys provide news updates and practical tips in patent portfolio development, IP litigation, trademarks, copyrights, trade secrets and licensing.

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